Damascus, SANA – Terrorist organizations continue to block the besieged residents of Yarmouk Camp neighborhood in Damascus from gaining access to humanitarian aid by targeting the convoys sometimes and attacking the
residents at other times.

The terrorists’ attacks, which have included gun, sniper and mortar fire, often occur upon the arrival of representatives from the General Authority for Palestine Arab Refugees (GAPAR) and the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees (UNRWA) at the site where the relief supplies are being distributed.

GAPAR Director General Ali Mustafa told SANA in a statement on Saturday that the convoys in Yarmouk Camp, a neighborhood hosting Palestinian refugees and Syrian citizens, had to leave the distribution site in al-Rama Street today and go back to their headquarters in Damascus after terrorists opened fire on the site.

Mustafa confirmed that the residents who gathered in the distribution site, located at the medical center affiliated to the Palestine Red Crescent Society (PRCS), also came under the terrorist gunfire and mortar attack.

A similar attack took place two days ago in which a woman and two children were injured.

The terrorist organizations besieging the neighborhood’s residents have been for the sixth week now trying to prevent access to the humanitarian aid, as Mustafa stressed, with the aim to continue starving the people and keeping them as hostages to achieve political objectives.

Mustafa, however, affirmed that the Syrian government will continue providing all facilitations to UNRWA to ensure the aid delivery and distribution in Yarmouk Camp, noting that the supplies have been increased by 500 food
packages and 500 packages containing medical supplies.

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Since January 30, 2014, the GAPAR has distributed around 60,000 food packages and 12,000 medical supply packages, while around 7,000 students and people with critical medical situation were evacuated.

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