(IRNA) “The publication (of these documents) is the culmination of decades of internal debates and public controversy after a previous official collection omitted all references to the role of American and British intelligence in the ouster of Iran’s then-prime minister, Mohammad Mosaddeq,” according to National Security Archive.

The documents are part of the US Department of State’s venerable Foreign Relations of the United States (FRUS) series which are published by the Department.

“For decades, neither the U.S. nor the British governments would acknowledge their part in Mosaddeq’s overthrow, even though a detailed account appeared as early as 1954 in The Saturday Evening Post, and since then CIA and MI6 veterans of the coup have published memoirs detailing their activities,” according to National Security Archive.

In 2000, The New York Times posted a 200-page classified internal CIA history of the operation and in 1989, the State Department released what purported to be the official record of the coup period but it made not a single reference to American and British actions in connection with the event, according to National Security Archive.

The omission led to the resignation of the chief outside adviser on the series, and prompted Congress to pass legislation requiring “a thorough, accurate, and reliable documentary record” of U.S. foreign policy.

After the end of the Cold War, the CIA committed to open agency files on Iran and other covert operations, and the State Department vowed to produce a “retrospective” volume righting the earlier decision but it took until 2011 for the CIA to – partially – fulfill its commitment, according to National Security Archive.

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The US and the British governments’ justifications to not mention their roles in the coup were that they to protect their intelligence sources and methods, bow to British government requests and, more recently, avoid stirring up Iranian hardline elements who, according to their claims, might seek to undercut the nuclear deal Iran signed with the United States and other P5+1 members in 2015.

On the preface of this volume published by the Department of State it is said that ‘This Foreign Relations retrospective volume focuses on the use of covert operations by the Truman and Eisenhower administrations as an adjunct to their respective policies toward Iran, culminating in the overthrow of the Mosadeq government in August 1953.’

This volume contains a lot of documents about the correspondences between the US embassy in Tehran, the US Department of State and the CIA.

In one of the published documents on August 19, 1953, there is a five-million-dollar request of CIA agent from the US to help Zahedi’s government which reveals that the US besides its advising role in launching the coup had the direct role of funding the coup makers against Mosadeq government.

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