BEIRUT, LEBANON (6:00 P.M.) – The U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) “mistakenly” revealed the identity of a former official at the Saudi embassy in Washington, who is suspected of providing strong support to two of the participants in the September 11, 2001 terrorist atacks.

This was reported by Yahoo News, Wednesday, noting that the disclosure of this information came in a new document submitted to a federal court.

Although the document is supposed to obscure the name of the Saudi official, his name was incorrectly mentioned in one of the paragraphs, according to the website, which stated that this is considered one of the most sensitive secrets of the U.S. government about the attacks.

The matter is related to Ahmed Al-Jarrah, a former official in the Saudi Foreign Ministry who was assigned to the Saudi embassy in Washington, DC between 1999 and 2000.

According to Yahoo News, Ahmed Al-Jarrah’s duties included overseeing the activities of Ministry of Islamic Affairs’ employees in the U.S.

The document did not refer to his whereabouts, but the site mentioned, quoting former employees of the embassy, ​​that he was later appointed to the Saudi missions in Malaysia and Morocco, where he is believed to have worked there until last year.

The document, written by a senior FBI official, and revealed earlier this week, indicated that there were suspicions that Al-Jarrah was providing aid to two Al-Qaeda operatives who carried out the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center.

It is unclear how strong the evidence is against the former Saudi official, as it remains a matter of intense debate within the FBI for years, but the disclosure, which a senior US government official confirmed had occurred in error, is likely to revive questions about possible links between Saudi officials and the attacks, according to The same source.

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“The aforementioned disclosure shed light on the exceptional efforts made by senior officials of the administration of US President Donald Trump in recent months to prevent the leaking of internal documents on the issue and its appearance in public,” the website said.

The Saudi government has consistently denied any connection with the September 11 attacks, and told the New York Times last January that “Saudi Arabia has been and remains a close and important ally of the United States in the war against terrorism.”

 

Source: Yahoo News

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