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Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov has commented on the situation in the war-plagued Syria, including the issue of US military presence in the country and its support of Kurdish factions.

“It is clear that the United States has some strategy which I believe entails staying in Syria forever with its armed forces… They are gearing up for separating a huge part of Syria from the rest of the country, violating Syria’s sovereignty of territorial integrity. There they will create quasi-local authorities, will try to create autonomy based on the Kurds,” Lavrov told Euronews in an interview.

The Russian Foreign Minister has stressed that Washington has deployed its forces in the war-torn country without a sanction from the United Nations of a request from the legitimate Syrian government in Damascus.

She also stressed that the US military “entered into a virtually open confrontation with the Syrian army” by openly supporting allied Kurdish militant groups.

Brett McGurk, US Special Presidential Envoy for the Global Coalition to Counter IS, said in the end of 2017 that Washington would maintain a military presence at the al-Tanf garrison and other areas of Syria to prevent Daesh terrorists from returning o liberated parts of the country. The Russian military, in turn, noted that the al-Rubkan refugee camp was located 11 miles south of al-Tanf, stressing that the US presence could hamper the delivery of the humanitarian aid to the refugees.

The US has been conducting airstrikes in Syria as part of the international coalition’s campaign to eradicate Daesh in the country. The US military coalition that consists of over 70 members has neither been authorized by the Syrian government nor the UN Security Council.

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Source: Sputnik

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Stern Daler
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The US overlook that Syria can sanction the Kurdish which makes independence economically unsustainable on the long run. Economy needs transit routes. The Kurdish cantons currently are at odds with Turkey. Federal Iraq and Iraq’s Barsanistan. The later shares the problem. It is also land locked and relies on neighbours and Iraq’s central government for economic transit routes.

p.s. An argument that would also apply for a bigger Kurdish state.
It would be land locked and its neighbours could sanction it.

Daeshbags Sux
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Daeshbags Sux

Well, it can be unlocked by cutting into Turkey to the Mediterranean and/or the Black Sea. It could also un-landlock Armenia at the same time… After all, the Sèvres treaty can be applied since Erdogan is resuming the Ottoman Empire…
If neighbours sanction a landlocked country the way you describe, it can open a casus belli as it can be seen as a blockade.
Better be careful before economical sanctions : it can backfire the hard way…

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Stern Daler

Blockade of transit routes is no casus belli. You can trade with whom You want.

p.s. You already read that US Department of the State may want to sanction Turkey if this s Afrin s**t continues?

truthslayer
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truthslayer

How are the SAA supposed to defend areas that the Kurds and the US coalition refuse them entry to and have illegally occupied..?

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George King

Pay attention, the Syrian alliance has in one voice stated “there will not be another Israel in the Middle East”.

Dreamed of Kurdistan will never exist on sovereign soil with self ruled areas, this has passed and they are no longer to be trusted in national affairs in any country other than as individual citizens or nothing. The problem with this dream is you have to be asleep to believe in it.

Daeshbags Sux
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Daeshbags Sux

If Syrian govt doesn’t helps to repel Turkish forces and their terrorist proxies in Afrin, exactly the same way they didn’t helped the Kurds to repel ISIS, so Syria doesn’t deserve Rojava to still be a part of Syria as the govt does NOTHING to protect its public but instead, let them behind to die in the hands of barbarians.