On Friday, September 4th, Tunisia officially reopened their embassy in the Syrian capital of Damascus after cutting off ties with the Syrian Government two years ago.

According to a government source in Damascus, the Tunisian Ambassador to Syria and his staff conducted their first meeting with the Syrian Foreign Minister, Walid Mu’allem, around 10 A.M. (Damascus Time) to strengthen ties between the two countries.

Tunisia cutoff ties with Syria in 2013 after the Muslim Brotherhood offshoot “Ennahda Party” – led by Rachid Ghannouchi – gained the majority of the Tunisian Parliamentary seats, resulting in the closing of their embassy in Damascus and the removal of the Syrian Embassy in Tunis.

However, in late 2014, the tension between the two aforementioned countries had dissipated and the Ennahda Party lost the majority of the seats in the Tunisian Parliament.

Following the elections, the Tunisian government agreed to rapprochement with the Syrian government; this rekindled relationship was facilitated by Algerian diplomats that worked as a intermediary between Tunisia and Syria.

Recently, Egypt expressed has also expressed interest in rapprochement with the Syrian Government after Mohammad Morsi and his Muslim Brotherhood-led government cutoff all diplomatic ties with Damascus in favor of the Syrian Opposition.

With Morsi under arrest, General ‘Abdel-Fattah Al-Sisi has championed the cause to boost Egypt’s regional relationships; this included the possibility of rapprochement with Syria.

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