(REUTERS) President Donald Trump vowed on Wednesday to do “whatever is necessary” to broker peace between Israel and the Palestinians as he hosted Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas at the White House but offered no sign of how he could revive long-stalled negotiations.

In their first face-to-face meeting, Trump pressed Abbas and other Palestinian leaders to “speak in a unified voice against incitement” to violence against Israelis but he stopped short of explicitly recommitting his administration to a two-state solution to the decades-old conflict, a long-standing foundation of U.S. policy.

Despite what many experts see as a long-shot bid, Trump told Abbas: ” I will do whatever is necessary … I would love to be a mediator or an arbitrator or a facilitator, and we will get this done.”

Abbas reasserted the overarching goal of a Palestinian state, saying it must have its capital in East Jerusalem with borders based on pre-1967 lines. Israel rejects a full return to 1967 borders as a threat to its security.

Trump has faced deep skepticism at home and abroad over his chances for any quick diplomatic breakthrough, not least because the new U.S. administration has yet to articulate a cohesive strategy for restarting the moribund peace process.

Abbas’ White House talks follow a February visit by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who moved to reset ties after a combative relationship with the Republican president’s predecessor, Democratic President Barack Obama.

Trump sparked international criticism at the time when he appeared to back away from support for a two-state solution, saying he would leave it up to the parties themselves to decide. The goal of a Palestinian state has been the position of successive U.S. administrations and the international community

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The meeting with Abbas, the Western-backed head of the Palestinian Authority, was another test of whether Trump, in office a little more than 100 days, is serious about pursuing the kind of comprehensive peace agreement that eluded his predecessors.

Trump, during a joint appearance with Abbas, said he was ready to attempt the “toughest deal” of Israeli-Palestinian peace. But as he later sat down to lunch with the Palestinian leader, he said it was “maybe not as difficult as people have thought over the years.”

But Trump, who said he decided to “start a process” but offered no new policy prescriptions or timetable, may be underestimating the challenge when trust between the two sides is at a low point, analysts said.

“You can’t just pretend you only have to handle a few key issues and that’s it,” said David Makovsky, a senior member of Obama’s negotiating team during the last round of talks, which collapsed in 2014. “It’s very hard.”

Still, plans are being firmed up for Trump to visit Netanyahu in Jerusalem and possibly Abbas in the West Bank, targeted for May 22-23, according to people familiar with the matter. That has sparked speculation about a meeting between the three. U.S. and Israeli officials, however, have declined to confirm the visit.

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hestroy
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Khazars never give up any piece of land they have stolen.

Daeshbags Sux
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Abbas is one of the worst hypocrites on Earth! He’s speaking like this in English and speaks totally differently in Arab, promoting large scale violence like the knife-intifada which id praised by all Palestinian teacher in UN-sponsored schools (!). Now, after his knife-intifada, he uses the diplomatic taqiyya again to obtain something and as soon as he’ll get anythin, as usual, he’ll engage himself about nothing a, at the moment of signing the commitment, violence will resume and he’ll use this to charge Israelis about it and to back-up. Let’s be clear : a state building would mean no more… Read more »