German prosecutors have charged a Syrian man with second-degree murder for the stabbing of a citizen in the east German city of Chemnitz, sparking violent protests and clashes with police in August.

The suspect, who is reportedly a Syrian asylum seeker and was identified only as Alaa S. due to national privacy laws, is accused of stabbing a German-Cuban man during a quarrel.

This development comes as Berlin issued an international arrest warrant for another suspect in the case, who is reportedly on the run. The suspect of Iraqi origin was identified as Farhad R.A.

Daniel Hillig was killed in Chemnitz on 26 August, allegedly by two migrants of Iraqi and Syrian descent.

Earlier, prosecutors pledged to make a decision on the third suspect in the Chemnitz killing over the next few days. Iraqi citizen Yousif Awas was released from custody due to a lack of evidence in September, according to his lawyer.

Mr. Hillig’s murder sparked a wave of anti-immigrant rallies and counter-protests in the subsequent weeks, with thousands of people taking to the streets of the Saxon city.

About 18 people were injured and hundreds more detained during the rallies which saw violent clashes between police and various groups of protesters.

 

Source: Sputnik

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J. Jesus Ramirez
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J. Jesus Ramirez

If NATO states would have minded there business and stayed out of Syria there would be no “Syrian asylum seeker”.

Daeshbags-Sux
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Daeshbags-Sux

NATO is not implied. Would they, the state of Syria as we know it would have ceased to exist, period.

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Matija Tomac

Like the Taliban ceased to exist?

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@Matija Tomac, maybe the NATO wages far too humane?

Killing the enemy combatants including their kin, like Taliban, Qaeda and IS do as Jiahdi terrorists, would have ended the Jihadi’s wars long ago.

p.s. During the crusades period the Europeans also waged war according to the customs of Jiahad.
Maybe if the Jihadis continue the Rest of The World should act as crusaders against them.

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Matija Tomac

So there are not enough dead Afghan civilians jet (and given the fact that for instance most of the time US drone operators do not know whom they are targeting (and do not care) “more killing” would just mean more dead Afghan civilians). It is not as if this strategy would backfire and drive even more Afghan people in the arms of the Taliban. This and the corrupt puppet government that the West has instale (in order to plunder Afghanistan).
P.S. Why this fascination with the Crusades. They were not about religion but about plunder (best proof-the 4th Crusade).

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@Matija Tomac, look how the Pashtun Taliban subdued the Hazaras. How the Turks waged war on the Balkans, Stephen III of Moldavia or Vlad Țepeș waged war inspired by the Turks. A bright man said something like, Guerrilla must act like fish in water, if they want to have success. Take away the water aka the civilian group that feeds and replenishes them – they will have no water. That is how e.g. the Catholic French won the Chevennes war against the Reformed or the war against the Albigenses. p.s. The Holocausts of Jews, Armenians, Assyrians and Greeks (in Turkey)… Read more »

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Matija Tomac

You seem to be confusing Medieval era wars with a modern war (in this case Afghanistan). So what you are saying the US should just murder every Afghan? But that would be counterproductive to the TRUE goal. Unlike those conflicts in France, the Holocaust or the Armenian and Assyrian genocide (where one of the objective was to kill or expel the people and replace them with your own (in the process you also plunder)) the US does not want to replace Afghans with Americans or “Americanise” the Afghans. It wants to exploit them, steal their resources, use there country as… Read more »

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@Matija Tomac, the Middle Ages lasted from the 5th to the 15th century. Stephen III of Moldavia was reigned from 1457 to 1504… So much about my confusions about eras and wars. I do know the Ottomans initially fostered Dracula and only the Albigenses & 4th Crusade are prior to the Renaissance.
I am not confusing but seeing similarities.
War is all about gain and pooling resources for Your own and Your in groups use. The Jihadi are the “inner enemy” who You replace – or do You think anyone can propose to kill all the population in say Afghanistan?

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BTW. The aspirations of families like the well connected Aleramici, the schism between the Christian churches and mere mishap were among the reasons why the 4th crusade changed its cause.

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Matija Tomac

This does not change the fact that the Crusades were first and foremost about plunder.
Zadar was sacked in order to pay Venice, and Constantinople was sacked in order to plunder it (because the Crusaders did not receive the payment they were promised by Alexios Angelos if they help him to take over the Byzantine Empire).

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@Matija Tomac, I said that wars are generally about gain, so I do not have to change the fact that Crusades were about plunder.

p.s. The population of knightly families rose and especially those, that did not inherit enough, became crusaders. Compare the Normans in Sicily and God knows where. Norman inheritance customs favored the first born. They were the Blackwater of their times. They went out to carve out their own fiefdom somewhere.

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Matija Tomac

Funny how you try to have a “gotcha” moment on the length of the Middle Ages (which is not important in this conversation). However the Middle Ages lasted until 1492. (when that mass murderer Columbus came to the Americas/ this is the most common end year). So most of the reign of Stephen was during the Middle Ages.
“or do You think anyone can propose to kill all the population in say Afghanistan” So what are you talking about when you say that one needs to “remove the water”? Or do you only want to kill more Afghans, but not all?

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@Matija Tomac, Middle Ages lasted to the fall of Constantinople 1453, because the movement of scholars to the West was essential for the Renaissance. But that and 1492 is also in the 15th century.

The 15th century saw economical and other innovations, so most do not date the Middle Ages to a single year but to a gradual change.

You can remove the Taliban supporting water and rise the price tag for supporting them. But never mind.

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Matija Tomac

For the record: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_the_Middle_Ages “Events between the traditional end of the Middle Ages in 1492 and the beginning of the 16th century” It is a good sign that the “stick” approach has been dropped. The best way to defeat the Taliban would be if we replace the puppet government with a government that takes care of its citizens, which provides service to them (like water that you mentioned, better education, better healthcare…) … However, that would be against the interests of Western occupiers and it will not happen. Currently the “best” option is a peace between the government and the… Read more »

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@Matija, Wie bei allen Periodisierungen in der Geschichtswissenschaft lassen sich keine exakt datierbaren Epochengrenzen ziehen.

“There are no exact dates where to put the borders between the periods.”

And to chose 1492, the so called discovery of America, is pretty arbitrary and America-Centric for it does not change much.

The fall of Constantinople and Gutenberg’s printing press for example have greater effect for the development of the coming epoch.

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Matija Tomac

“it does not change much”-Tell that to the Natives that experienced one of the greatest genocide in human history. Also Spain and the riches that they stole would disagree. The coming of that mass murderer to America may be America-Centric, but the fall of Constantinople is Europe-centric. But this is all besides the main point (Afghanistan) that we discussed. And it seems that historians have different views about the end of one era and the beginning of another.

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@Matija, it does not change much because America was discovered almost 400 years earlier. I did not refer to the ill behavior of the Histpanios and Anglos in the Americas. The fall of Constantinople moved many educated to Western Europe and is one of the causes of the Renaissance. The Renaissance laid the foundations to modern developments. That is why I ‘d chose it. The conquest of the Americas did not change much. The Historians usually chose no specific date. That is what the German and my English rendering says. p.s. My remark about Afghanistan was about war tactics in… Read more »

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Matija Tomac

The “discovery” of America by that mass murderer Columbus was significant because it was the beginning of the end of countries in the Americas and the beginning of the colonisation of the Americas. The Atlantic ocean replaced the Mediterranean as the main trading route (that meant the rise of Spain, Portugal and later France and the UK and the decline of Italian states like Venice that dependent on trade).And lets not forget the fact that the loots from the “New world” greatly contributed to the rise of Europe. “The conquest of the Americas did not change much.” Tell that to… Read more »

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@Matija, the decline Mediterranean as a main trading route for spice was not caused by the discovery of the Americas by the Spanish in 1492 but by the Portuguese reaching India AFAIR 1498. From that Portugal reaped huge fortunes and became an economic and military super power competing and waring with the Ottoman empire.

The Spanish loot from the Americas was squandered on wars and luxury but did not contribute to the rise of Europe as did the Renaisance. The spiritual and scientific innovations that make up the modern world are not owed to the discovery of America.

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Matija Tomac

So the conclusion. The NATO occupation has failed.

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@Matija Tomac, yes failed. Both for the reasons that you see and that I see.

Sweet robert
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Sweet robert

Douse sux is in denial.

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@Sweety R., rightfully so – since NATO was not involved.

Or explain: Since when are the Bani Saud, the Bani Thani and the other Gulf states NATO members? And the criminal Turk Sultan and US Emperors, elected for four years, waging war in Syria are definitely not representing NATO; NATO is a defense alliance.

NATO represents 60% of the military assets on this planet. Do You want to tell me that NATO took 7 years to finish Syria in an open war? No, NATO was not involved.

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@J. Jesus Ramirez, what has Germany to do with US and Turkey’s breaking international laws such as UN’s A/RES/2625(XXV)?

The other states fermenting riots in Syria and paying terrorist mercenaries are from the Gulf and not even NATO members.

NATO represents 60% of the military assets on this planet. Do You want to tell me that NATO took 7 years to finish Syria in an open war? No, NATO was not involved.

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p.s. Are You jealous the the Asylum seeker was Syrian?
There were and are also Latino Asylum seekers. Maybe Germany should dismiss all, because they are all coming for economical reasons. Else they would have stayed in the first save country on their way to Germany.