The Syrian Arab Army inside of Khan Sheikhoun after declaring full control over the city on Thursday, August 22nd, 2019.

BEIRUT, LEBANON (7:45 P.M.) – The Syrian Arab Army’s (SAA) capture of Khan Sheikhoun last Thursday proved to be the nail in the coffin for the militant forces in northern Hama, as just one day later, the military’s high command announced full control over the once militant-held pocket.

Despite claims by Hay’at Tahrir Al-Sham about defending their northern Hama pocket at all costs, the jihadist group ultimately succumbed to the pressure and fled the pocket before being completely encircled by the Syrian Arab Army.

Syrian Army cuts the last militant supply lines to the northern countryside of Hama; thus, leaving the militants fully besieged. Al-Masdar News

According to a military source in the area, some militants chose to stay back and try to fend off the Syrian Arab Army attack; however, they ultimately gave us their fight by either surrendering to the military or fleeing to the Turkish observation post at Morek.

As a result of this advance by the Syrian Army, they were able to fully secure their two strongholds, Mhardeh and Al-Sqaylabiyeh, which were constantly targeted by the militants in the northern countryside of the Hama Governorate.

The northern countryside of the Hama Governorate after the militants conceded their last areas to the Syrian Arab Army. Al-Masdar News

With this region captured, the Syrian Arab Army has two choices: attack Ma’arat Al-Nu’man to the north or the Al-Ghaab Plain to the northwest.

 

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Jerry Smith
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Jerry Smith

Now let’s finally capture Kabani!

Long Live Syria
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Long Live Syria

I like this Map. Few days ago that dotted line was Green & now it is fully RED.

Daeshbags-Sux
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Daeshbags-Sux

Ah, Trap-a-Roach always works great.

Sweet Robert
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Sweet Robert

Does anyone know why they could not do both? Why is it either this or either that?

JerryDrakeJr
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JerryDrakeJr

Lack of manpower is the only reason.

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steven clark

Agree man power … unless they pull everyone from having time off and other fighter’s from all over the country then am sure they could give a good go…but that let’s isis in again out in the desert…I have know idea why that isn’t a priority for the SAA cause they are losing men everytime they attack…. Syria never had this problem before the war…

Sweet Robert
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Sweet Robert

d**n, too bad manpower shortage.

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Paulo Romero

Isis remnants are hemmed in , between all the warring factions in Syria and the Iraqis.Their main source of supplies are still the smuggling routes through Idlib , which are sustained by the Turkish presence. The drive for Idlib , and fighting against larger militant groups like HTS , is a good strategy for the Syrians. If they seal off the vast majority of Idlib , and surround the Turks in a pocket, then Isis will be squeezed and easily flushed out of their desert hideouts.