On Monday morning, the Syrian Arab Army’s 5th Armored Division – in coordination with the National Defense Forces (NDF) and Palestine Liberation Army (PLA) – captured five villages near the strategic town of Al-Lijat; this resulted in the obstruction of the rebel supply route from the country of Jordan to the Dara’a Governorate.

As a result of their success, the SAA’s 5th Division and their allies encircled the imperative town of Busra Al-Hareer, attempting to break-through the rebel defenses at the western axis; however, the latter was able to maintain their ground amid the swarming tanks and infantrymen.

Rebel forces were able to obstruct the 5th Division’s progress at Busra Al-Hareer, due to the rough terrain and open fields that left the latter’s tanks susceptible to the enemy combatant’s anti-tank missiles and entrenched fighters surrounding this town near the border of the As-Sweida Governorate.

According to a military source in the area, the SAA and their allies have suffered a confirmed 28 soldiers killed-in-action (KIA) in the last 24 hours at Busra Al-Hareer; this number includes 11 SAA, 3 PLA, and 14 NDF casualties.

The source added that the rebel forces sustained high casualties; however, he was unable to give an exact number of enemy combatants killed due to the ongoing battle between the opposing forces.

The rebel forces did suffer a loss in their leadership, as two field commanders from Harakat ‘Ahrar Al-Sham were killed at Busra Al-Hareer on Monday: the commanders were identified as ‘Abdullah Hamada Al-Hariri (AKA: “Abu Khalil Al-Hariri”) and “Abu ‘Azzam Al-Jabaab.”

More clashes were reported at the villages of Milayhat Al-‘Atash, Al-Hirak, and Al-Rikmat, where the SAA and NDF attempted to expand their control over the area surrounding the besieged town of Busra Al-Hareer.

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Fighting was also reported in the Dara’a Governorate at the villages of Inkhil, Qarfa, Kafr Shamis, Dara’a Al-Balad (Mail Depot), Dilli, Al-Karak, and ‘Itmaan.

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Editor-in-Chief Specializing in Near Eastern Affairs and Economics.

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