BEIRUT, LEBANON (12:30 P.M.) – Sudanese Prime Minister ‘Abdullah Hamdouk said this weekend that the Yemeni conflict cannot be solved militarily, but only through political dialogue between the rival parties.

Hamdouk further said that the Sudanese military is currently present inside Yemen, pointing out that there are thousands of soldiers in the country, Sputnik Arabic reported.

However, Hamdouk did specify that the total number of Sudanese soldiers in Yemen did not exceed 25,000.

The President of the Transitional Sovereign Council of Sudan, Abdel-Fattah Al-Burhan, last month touched on the participation of the Sudanese forces in the Yemen war.

In an interview with Al-Jazeera, Al-Burhan said that the Sudanese forces are present in Yemen at the request of the legitimate government, and that his country’s forces are not carrying out missions.

“The Sudanese forces will remain in Yemen until the goal for which they participated is achieved,” he said.

Sudan has been participating in the Arab coalition-led war in Yemen since March 2015. While the total number of Sudanese soldiers killed is unknown, there have been reports of several casualties throughout the war.

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FairsFair
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FairsFair

This is one of the worst kept secrets in the conflict in the Yemen. And when you consider the Sudan has its own internal problems this participation in the Saudi expansion into the Yemen does not make sense for the Sudanese.
But, hey, who said modern geopolitics makes any sense?

Daeshbags-Sux
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Daeshbags-Sux

There is no Saudi expansion in Yemen : all are here at the request of the Yemeni government just like Russians and Iranians are in Syria at Syrian govt. request.
Iran is trying to do to Yemen the same thing Turkey did to Syria. Houthis are the equivalent to al-Nusra/HTS for the country.

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Nestor Arapa

Sudan ni siquiera puede resolver sus problemas y este tipo mandando soldados a pedido de la Monarquía, de aquí se deduce que el tipo está al servicio del Imperio, sabemos que EE.UU. es aliado de la Monarquía Saudí.

Daeshbags-Sux
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Daeshbags-Sux

Hopefully, Sudan switched sides after overthrowing the infamous former prez al-Bashir who is still wanted for crimes against humanity and war crimes by the ICC.