The Islamic State of Iraq and Al-Sham (ISIS) launched a large-scale offensive at the provincial capital of Al-Hasakah on Wednesday, targeting the Syrian Armed Forces’ defensive positions at the southern and western sectors of the city for the fourth time this year; however, unlike their previous offensives, the terrorist group has achieved considerable success.

As a result of their persistency, ISIS has been able to penetrate through the Syrian Arab Army’s defensive barriers at the Al-Nashwa District after sleeper cells inside the city provided the terrorist group with not only invaluable intel, but also, access to the enemy’s frontlines that proved vital in their successful offensive.

Following their capture of the Al-Nishwa and Al-Liliyah Districts, the militants from ISIS focused their attention on the Al-Hasakah Central Prison, where they were met with fierce resistance from the SAA’s 123rd Brigade of the 3rd Armored Division the National Defense Forces (NDF), and the Al-Ba’ath Battalions(Kata’eb Al-Ba’ath”).

Unable to break-into the Al-Hasakah Central Prison, ISIS was forced to withdrawal to the Al-Liliyah District, leaving the Syrian Armed Forces in position to counter the terrorist Al-Liliyah and Al-Nishwa; this would come to fruition on Friday morning, when the Syrian Armed Forces recaptured Al-Liliyah and the eastern corridor of Al-Nishwa.

On Saturday morning, Major General Issam Zahreddine arrived with the 104th Airborne Brigade of the Republican Guard to help safeguard the provincial capital and drive-out the militants from ISIS.

According to a military source in Al-Hasakah, at least 400 soldiers from the Republican Guard have arrived thus far – more are expected to arrive in the coming hours.

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The source further added that the terrorist group has suffered significantly high casualties in their attempt to capture the provincial capital; current estimates range from as low as 70 and as high as 150 enemy combatant casualties.

 

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Editor-in-Chief Specializing in Near Eastern Affairs and Economics.

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