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BEIRUT, LEBANON (11:25 A.M.) – Well over ten thousand children who were once living in rebel-controlled areas of Damascus’ East Ghouta region have since returned to school.

Sources say that the number of children from East Ghouta that have returned to schools is as high as twelve thousand (12,000) – this comes following the restoration of their native towns and districts in the region to government control.

Moreover, reports state that East Ghouta district towns like Saqba and Kafr Batna – cleared from rebel forces no longer than two weeks ago – have since had their schools reopened.

Education is highly-valued in Syrian society – a type of national culture exists that strongly encourages children to pursue expertise (such as becoming doctors or engineers). Despite the deprivations of the ongoing crisis, the government makes top priority of returning children to school in areas taken back from militant groups.

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You can call me AL
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You can call me AL

Love that last pictures, reminding me of when I was in school at that age.

But, the article states “Education is highly-valued in Syrian society” – very, very true as I saw there when over that one time and Iran where an incredible percentage are young, degree educated (in normal subjects, not these PC BS courses, we have now) and Asia from first hand experience.

Bernt
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Bernt
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Such lovely pictures, boys and girls classes at school. When I went to ground school in my country (Norway) we had mixed classes (60 years ago). My experience was that we the boys could learn a lot from the girls by schooling and playing together.