On April 20, fierce urban firefights erupted in Qamishli after Kurdish police (Asayish) failed to stop at a government checkpoint inside the Syrian border city.

Effectively, the city’s residents witnessed clashes for the next 72 hours which in turn left 10 Kurdish troops and 22 government soldiers dead along with 17 civilians.

On April 22, a Russian delegation brokered a ceasefire in the city which has since been respected by both sides.

In the aftermath of the three-day battle, the Ayayish and YPG were in control of a formerly government-held prison on the eastern outskirts of the city while the National Defence Forces (NDF) gained control of several sites in Qamishli’s central districts.

With a truce in place, both sides quickly released prisoners taken during the clashes.

Contrary to the situation in Hasakah city, all joint Syrian-Kurdish checkpoints have been dismantled and tensions are still ever present in Qamishli.

Although government soldiers are de facto surrounded by Kurdish forces in Qamishli, their troops still control a approximately 50 villages south of the border city.

However, the Ayayish and YPG will likely attempt to capture the city itself at some point in time as it represents the capital of their Rojava Government (Syrian Kurdistan).

To do so, Kurdish forces must defeat hundreds of soldiers and fighters loyal to the Syrian Government; most notably the Arab tribesmen of the NDF and Assyrian paramilitary forces of the Sootooro and Hamiya Al-Jazeerah.

Nevertheless, no clashes have been reported in Qamishli since the ceasefire was signed by commanders of both sides.

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Student currently living in Denmark. Special focus on news from Syria, MENA map-making and strategical military analysis.

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Aidan Astwood
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Aidan Astwood

@Syria_Protector hope it stays that way.

reader
Guest
reader

Kurds are turds

daeshit sucks
Guest
daeshit sucks

Yeah, much better! It was a bad thing for both parts, and an extremely bad thing for the 49 who lost their lives :'(

Stein
Guest
Stein

the ‘turds’ were emboldened by US weapons, that gave them superiority
-and perhaps suggestions from US advisors that they should go for it..
Govt should get more resources in place there.