Saad Hariri at the governmental palace in Beirut, Lebanon on October 24, 2017 (Photo by Reuters)

BEIRUT, LEBANON (4:30 P.M.) – Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri announced new reforms on Monday after asking protesters to give him 72 hours on Friday to meet with his government in order to produce a plan.

According to Hariri, the Lebanese cabinet ended its session on Monday with new proposed reforms, which were later agreed upon by the government.

Hariri said in a press conference that the government approved the economic paper to reduce the salaries of current and former presidents, ministers and deputies by 50 percent.

He said: “I do not ask the young men and women in the streets anything, but I am in their .service,” he continued, “The budget does not include any new taxes, or additions, with the contribution of the banking sector.”

The Prime Minister continued that “the reduction of 50 percent of the salaries of current and former presidents, ministers and deputies,” will be followed by the “reducing the budgets of the Council for Development and Reconstruction, the Fund for the Displaced and the Council of the South by 70 percent.”

He said: “Adoption of the draft amnesty law before the end of the current year, and the preparation of the law on the recovery of looted funds, and the adoption of a draft law to establish the National Authority to fight corruption before the end of the current year,” pointing to “the abolition of the Ministry of Information and a number of public institutions immediately, and prepare a plan to merge these institutions.”

Hariri stressed, “If your demand is for new elections, I am with you.”

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Today, the Lebanese continue to take to the streets again on a detailed day coinciding with the Council of Ministers’ first session since the start of the protests and the end of a deadline set by Prime Minister Saad Hariri, which led to the acceptance of the reform plan.

The protesters continue to demand regime change, despite the reforms announced by Saad Hariri.

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