Haddad 1 was seized by Greek caost guard in September 2015

A Turkey-bound cargo ship loaded with heavy and light weapons was seized by Greek coast guard, a source said.

The ship was originally procured by a France-based Saudi arms dealer, and was loaded in UK and France.

According to the source, who spoke with the condition of anonymity, the shipment was supposed to be delivered to Lebanese MP Khalid al-Dhaher in the northern Lebanese port of Tripoli, and eventually to al-Nusra Front in Syria under the supervision of Turkish intelligence.

Abdullah al-Chahal, the spiritual leader of a notorious Salfi movement in Lebanon, has reportedly brokered the whole operation.

Al-Dhaher, a Lebanese MP for the northern city of Tripoli, has been overtly backing ultra-hardline militants fighting Syrian President Bashar Assad.

The shipment was finally released after Turkey allegedly paid $750,000 to an influential Greek official. The Greek authorities then declared that it has investigated the shipment and found out loads of cartridges used for fishing.

In September 2015, The Greek coastguard seized the Bolivian-flagged vessel Haddad 1 off the island of Crete. A search of its cargo revealed almost 500,000 rounds of ammunition and 5,000 rifles hidden a board.

Haddad 1 was heading to an Islamist-held port in Libya in a suspected “Oil for Guns’ deal.

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Max Schumacher
Max Schumacher
2016-05-15 13:50

I’m a bit confused because you write extensively that the weapons were destined to Lebanese MP Al-Dhaher and possibly the Al-Nusra front; nevertheless you mention in the last paragraph they were destined to Lybia in an oil-for-arms deal. Which one of the contradicting claims should now be considered true?

Jonathan
Jonathan
2016-05-15 16:26
Reply to  Max Schumacher

Max, It is not confusing at all if you read the article. The author is referring to a shipment in September 2015 in the comment at the end. Comprehension is everything, Sir.

Name not necessary
Name not necessary
2016-05-15 17:57
Reply to  Max Schumacher

The latest ship seized is to Al-Nusra – the one seized in Sept 2015 is the one to Lybia.

Francis
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Francis
2016-05-15 18:24

Max, this article talks aout TWO ship. One A Turkey-bound cargo ship and second Haddad1 from La Paz. Problemis, that we do not know, how many such ships pass in Mediteranian Sea every day.

FreePen
FreePen
2016-05-15 19:24

these are very serious
accusations about bribery. How are they proved?

mikel mediavilla herrera
mikel mediavilla herrera
2016-05-15 22:12

BOLIVIAN FLAG? NOT IS IF I READ WELL. BUT BOLIVIA I THINK HAS NO OUTLET TO THE SEA

James
James
2016-05-16 06:04

It is impossible without the approval of the CIA Greek government is a CIA outlet an this kind of decision canot come from an but from the top and if you consider the silence of the media about it ……..