Fighters of the Syria Democratic Forces (SDF) carry their weapons as they walk in the western rural area of Manbij, in Aleppo Governorate, Syria, June 13, 2016. REUTERS/Rodi Said

BEIRUT, LEBANON (11:30 A.M.) – The last batch of fighters from the Kurdish-led People’s Protection Units (YPG) has left the key town of Manbij in northern Aleppo, the Manbij Military Council reported this morning.

The withdrawal of the YPG fighters from Manbij began on July 4th and continued up until July 16th.

With the withdrawal of the YPG forces in Manbij, the town itself will now be patrolled by the Turkish and U.S. armies, with the Manbij Military Council of the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) handling the civil governance.

The YPG was ultimately forced to leave Manbij after an agreement was put in place between the U.S. and Turkish forces in early June.

Turkish and U.S. troops were seen moving towards Manbij after the agreement and eventually patrolling the entire area around this important town.

Turkey had repeatedly complained about the YPG presence inside of Manbij and even threatened to launch a military operation to expel the Kurdish-led force from the town.

However, despite the Turkish presence, the Manbij Military Council has warned that they will not allow rebel groups to take hold of the town.

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You can call me AL
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You can call me AL

I am a little confused over this, in my limited mind, I cannot fathom out if this is a good or bad thing yet.

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Weldon Cheek

And once more the kurds are forced to give up towns and territory due to the Americans making deals with its ally Turkey, when are the kurds going to wake up and realise they are nothing in americas scheme? The u.s. has been supplying weapons to the jihadis,this is a fact,the turks are fully aligned with the jihadis,this is another fact, how is it that the kurds can possibly see this as an advantage to their hopes of even miniscule autonomy or recognition of their identity??? They need to tell the americans that they are not allied to them anymore… Read more »