BEIRUT, LEBANON (2:30 P.M.) – A jihadist civil war is ongoing in the Idlib Governorate this week, as two of the strongest factions are in a struggle for power.

A new report from the Idlib countryside confirmed that violent clashes broke out yesterday afternoon between the Hurras Al-Deen and Ansar Al-Tawhid groups on the one hand, and Hay’at Tahrir Al-Sham (HTS) on the other.

These clashes were heavily concentrated on the western outskirts of Idlib city, which has recently witnessed increased tensions between the jihadist groups over the last few days.

The reports indicated that the Hurras Al-Deen and Ansar Al-Tawhid groups brought a large number of reinforcements to western Idlib in order to expel Hay’at Tahrir Al-Sham from the administrative capital.

According to reports, the two jihadist groups, which are linked to Al-Qaeda, managed to capture the Idlib Central Prison, the Al-Kansarwah factory, and a number of housing blocs in the western side of the city.

The clashes that are still raging between the two parties and have resulted in the death and injury of dozens of their gunmen, coinciding with the continued attempt by Ansar Al-Tawhid and Hurras Al-Deen to capture the entire eastern sector of Idlib city.

Ansar Al-Tawhid, which was previously Jund Al-Aqsa, is a jihadist organization that has been involved in several battles over the years in northwestern Syria.

The group was founded by the famous terrorist, “Abu ‘Abdel-‘Aziz Al-Qatari”, a Palestinian national, before his subsequent assassination under mysterious circumstances.

The Hurras Al-Deen group consists of extremist fighters who announced in 2016 the establishment of their own organization to maintain their loyalty to the leader of Al-Qaeda in Afghanistan, Ayman al-Zawahiri.

ALSO READ  Turkish drones 'changed the rules of the game' in Libya and Syria: British Defense Secretary

The Hurras Al-Deen group is led by a Shura Council dominated by Jordanian fighters who fought in Afghanistan, Iraq, Bosnia, and the Caucasus, and they have a long history in the ranks of al-Qaeda.

Lastly, Hay’at Tahrir Al-Sham (HTS) was formed in 2018 after the collapse of Jaysh Al-Fateh, a jihadist coalition comprised of several groups, including Jabhat Al-Nusra, HTS’ predecessor.

Share this article:
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 2
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    2
    Shares

Notice: All comments represent the view of the commenter and not necessarily the views of AMN.

All comments that are not spam or wholly inappropriate are approved, we do not sort out opinions or points of view that are different from ours.

This is a Civilized Place for Public Discussion

Please treat this discussion with the same respect you would a public park. We, too, are a shared community resource — a place to share skills, knowledge and interests through ongoing conversation.

These are not hard and fast rules, merely guidelines to aid the human judgment of our community and keep this a clean and well-lighted place for civilized public discourse.

Improve the Discussion

Help us make this a great place for discussion by always working to improve the discussion in some way, however small. If you are not sure your post adds to the conversation, think over what you want to say and try again later.

The topics discussed here matter to us, and we want you to act as if they matter to you, too. Be respectful of the topics and the people discussing them, even if you disagree with some of what is being said.

Be Agreeable, Even When You Disagree

You may wish to respond to something by disagreeing with it. That’s fine. But remember to criticize ideas, not people. Please avoid:

  • Name-calling
  • Ad hominem attacks
  • Responding to a post’s tone instead of its actual content
  • Knee-jerk contradiction

Instead, provide reasoned counter-arguments that improve the conversation.