Three weeks after its liberation by the Syrian Armed Forces, the ancient city of Palmyra (Tadmur) is under another grave threat from the internationally recognized terrorist organization, the “Islamic State of Iraq and Al-Sham” (ISIS).

ISIS is far from finished in the east Homs countryside and they maintain a relatively large presence in the mountains that border the nearby Hama Governorate; this, coupled with their control of the Palmyra-Deir Ezzor Highway, leaves the ancient city in a vulnerable state.

Luckily, the pro-government paramilitary unit “Liwaa Suqour Al-Sahra” (Desert Hawks Brigade) remains behind to protect Palmyra, but for how long?

The terrorist group has already launched several attacks at the nearby villages of Al-Bayarat, Bardeh, and Jazal; these are all located within a few kilometers north of Palmyra and only.

Making matters worse for the Syrian Arab Army (SAA), ISIS is pushing south of the Brigade 550 Base, which is the last military installation before the Al-‘Amariyah District in northern Palmyra.

If ISIS can infiltrate the Syrian Armed Forces’ defenses at Al-Amariyah, they will be able to reenter Palmyra and wreck havoc on the city.

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Editor-in-Chief Specializing in Near Eastern Affairs and Economics.

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Nikko Moutafoglou
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Nikko Moutafoglou

Since Russias partial’s withdraw, nusras strength increased dramatically

Abid Sayed
Guest
Abid Sayed

go to meet with the angels of death!!!!

Kopfz
Guest
Kopfz

Bit disappointed that the Syrian Army are playing Al-Eis so poorly. They’re allowing this point to become a Stalingrad. Apart from ‘surprise attacks’ in the early hour of the morning (which aren’t surprises since that’s when the overwhelming majority of offensives are launched), the SAA and allies are not using any real strategy on this front, and are instead trying to take it by brute force with superior numbers. The point is too heavily defended right now, and therefore impossible to take without unacceptable losses. SAA needs to either break it with air superiority and artillery, out flank it, or… Read more »

Kopfz
Guest
Kopfz

SAA should rethink the strategy on this front. Al-Nusra have it too heavily defended for a frontal assault.

Peggy Breckin
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Peggy Breckin

@aj_observations oh no!

Mystiq
Guest
Mystiq

syrian army should plant new landmines for daash….BOOM

Benfatto
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Benfatto

Frankly I am a little amazed at the level of incompetence within the SAA to secure territory and hold it. Look at historical examples of how to do it: the Brits in the Boer-war, Morocco’s occupation of Western Sahara: you build fortification everywhere that can withstand an attack and brief siege by guerrillas, so that armored units can be mobilized to counter-attack. . Take Tal-Eis hill for instance: the SAA should have never withdrawn from such an excellent vantage point. If Al Nusra can hold it against an overwhelming force that has total air superiority, the SAA should have been… Read more »

Ancient Syria
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Ancient Syria

why didnt they liberate the surrounding areas ?

BraveNewWorld
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BraveNewWorld

I doubt it is that grim . The area around Palmyra is fairly flat and what high ground there is is still occupied by government forces meaning they can see things coming from a good distance and have fire control of a decent sized region. If they see any thing sizable coming their way aircraft can get there fairly quickly. Things are very different from when Daesh originally took Palmyra.