In late December of 2015, a three-way ceasefire agreement between the Syrian Arab Army (SAA), the Islamist rebels (primarily Harakat Ahrar Al-Sham and the Free Syrian Army) and the so-called “Islamic State of Iraq and Al-Sham” (ISIS) was put in place that would put an end to the fighting in several districts of southern Damascus and allow for civilians to return to their homes.

The 1st phase of this ceasefire was implemented in early January when all of the militants fled the Qadam District, resulting in the Syrian Armed Forces taking full control of this area; this also allowed for several displaced families to return to their homes.

Part of the 2nd phase consisted of transferring the estimated 4,000 ISIS terrorists from southern Damascus to Al-Raqqa; however, the aforementioned terrorist group was reluctant to leave.

Instead of leaving like they originally agreed to, ISIS moved their fighters from certain districts in order to strengthen their positions inside Yarmouk Camp.

As a result of this clear violation of the ceasefire agreement, ISIS has made it clear to all parties involved that they are unwilling to adhere to the guidelines set forth.

According to the military spokesperson from the pro-government Palestinian militia “Fatah Al-Intifada”, ISIS has taken control of several uncontested neighborhoods in the southern part of Yarmouk Camp District.

With this clear violation of the ceasefire agreement by the ISIS terrorists; it is safe to say that the battle for southern Damascus is far from over…

Share this article:
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
ALSO READ  Russian Air Force unleashes powerful attack on ISIS after terrorist group launches offensive

Notice: All comments represent the view of the commenter and not necessarily the views of AMN.

All comments that are not spam or wholly inappropriate are approved, we do not sort out opinions or points of view that are different from ours.

This is a Civilized Place for Public Discussion

Please treat this discussion with the same respect you would a public park. We, too, are a shared community resource — a place to share skills, knowledge and interests through ongoing conversation.

These are not hard and fast rules, merely guidelines to aid the human judgment of our community and keep this a clean and well-lighted place for civilized public discourse.

Improve the Discussion

Help us make this a great place for discussion by always working to improve the discussion in some way, however small. If you are not sure your post adds to the conversation, think over what you want to say and try again later.

The topics discussed here matter to us, and we want you to act as if they matter to you, too. Be respectful of the topics and the people discussing them, even if you disagree with some of what is being said.

Be Agreeable, Even When You Disagree

You may wish to respond to something by disagreeing with it. That’s fine. But remember to criticize ideas, not people. Please avoid:

  • Name-calling
  • Ad hominem attacks
  • Responding to a post’s tone instead of its actual content
  • Knee-jerk contradiction

Instead, provide reasoned counter-arguments that improve the conversation.