On Wednesday morning, the Islamic State of Iraq and Al-Sham (ISIS) launched a full-scale offensive in the Homs Governorate’s eastern countryside, where they are targeting the ancient Syriac Christian city of Qurayteen and the imperative Tiyas Military Airport that sit to the west of Palmyra.

The terrorist group began their assault at dawn on Wednesday morning, attempting to utilize a vehicle borne improvised explosive device (VBIED) to break-through the Syrian Armed Forces’ frontline defenses at the southeastern perimeter of the Tiyas Military Airport; however, this attempted suicide attack was repelled by the vigilant guards of the Syrian Arab Army (SAA) before it could reach its destination.

Following the attempted suicide attack, ISIS stormed the checkpoint outside the southeastern perimeter of Tiyas Military Airbase, where they were met with heavy resistance from the Syrian Arab Army and the National Defense Forces (NDF).

Unable to infiltrate past the Syrian Armed Forces’ frontline defenses, the terrorist group was forced to withdraw to the southeast after sustaining significant casualties during the intense battle for the Tiyas Military Airport and the Teefor Pumping Station.

Meanwhile, to the southwest of Tiyas Military Airport, ISIS has launched a powerful assault on the city of Qurayteen, targeting its checkpoints at the southeastern outskirts.

ISIS was able to capture two checkpoints outside of Qurayteen, which allowed for them to finally enter the city and entrench themselves along the road leading to the east district.

Firefights between the terrorist group and the Syrian Armed Forces are still ongoing inside the city of  Qurayteen, despite recent claims from ISIS social media activists.

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According to a military source in east Homs, reports from inside the city of Qurayteen have confirmed the death of 5 civilians at the hands of ISIS after they were captured by the terrorist group in the east district of the city.

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Daahireeto Mohamud
Daahireeto Mohamud
2015-08-06 10:49

As I have already noted time is essence, the slow pace of Zabadani offensive does not help SAA, look if Zabadani offensive was over , then their troops now tied up there would have been redeployed elsewhere, probobly they would have responded timely to ISIS offensive on Qaraytain and rebel resurgency at Darraya, SAA’e enemy are not missing their chances and when SAA is tied up in one front they will take the advantage of another front where is SAA may be thin, SAA’s casualty aversive approach and its slow progress when it regains momentum are the ”straregic weakness” of… Read more »