DAMASCUS, SYRIA (9:00 P.M.) – ISIS insurgents stationed in Raqqa city are now left to fend for themselves after the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) secured the entire southern bank of the Euphrates River city today.

Pushing through the southern countryside, the largely Kurdish SDF captured the Fakhayiah and Al-Gouta villages after lengthy clashes came to a halt on Monday.

In effect, ISIS is unable to escape along the M6-highway south of the city, rendering its fighters completely trapped within the gates of Raqqa itself.

Meanwhile, steady gains are underway inside the provincial capital where the SDF broke through ISIS’ defensive line in the western sector today.

Led by seasoned YPG assault troops, the SDF managed to wrestle control of Al-Qadisiyyah district on Monday afternoon and quickly after entered the neighboring Yarmouk and Darayeh neighborhoods that edge the M6-highway which runs vertically through the city.

Due to the final stage of the Euphrates Wrath offensive, the SDF controls roughly 20% of the former ISIS bastion. US Marines are also actively engaged, providing fire support and smashing ISIS-held rearguard positions with field guns.

Worth noting from a strategic perspective, all bridges across the Euphrates River have been destroyed by US-coalition warplanes. This in turn greatly hampers maneuverability for both sides on the battlefield arena.

Click here for a full battle map of Syria from an AMN partner.

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Student currently living in Denmark. Special focus on news from Syria, MENA map-making and strategical military analysis.

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hestroy
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hestroy

Destroying of infrastructure. Usual USA fun.

јоота
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јоота

You got things mixed up. In 2013-14 Kurds were losing ground rapidly and being stuck fighting for their life in Kobane. It took 6 months of NATO air strikes for them to survive. SAA was winning the war in late 2013 and if US and friends didn’t decide to double down, the war would have been over years ago. Nobody in his right mind was against the Kurds until they started playing for the same jihadi team that was poised to kill them just a year ago. Also the idea of Rojava encompassing 1/3 of Syria with 70% of non-Kurds… Read more »