The Islamic State of Iraq and Al-Sham (ISIS) launched another round of powerful attacks on the Syrian Armed Forces’ defensive positions inside the provincial capital of Deir Ezzor on Saturday morning, as they conducted two suicide attacks, while also firing over 60 mortar shells and rockets into the Al-Jubeileh, Al-Sina’a, and Al-‘Amal Districts.

ISIS began their assault at the Al-Jubeileh District on Saturday morning, when one of their combatants drove his vehicle borne improvised explosive device (VBIED) into the Al-Fardous Mosque, which resulted in the complete destruction of the building, along with the death of a dozen civilians.

Following the ISIS suicide attack at the Al-Fardous Mosque, the terrorist group stormed the Syrian Arab Army’s frontline defenses at the northern sector of the Al-Jubeileh District, where they found little success due to the fierce resistance from the soldiers entrenched inside the surrounding buildings.

With little progress made and over 15 casualties reported, the terrorist group withdrew from the northern sector of Al-Jubeileh in order to evade the Syrian Arab Air Force’s (SAAF) Hind Helicopters that were lurking around these neighborhoods.

In addition to their assault on the Al-Jubeileh District, ISIS conducted a number of attacks on the Syrian Arab Army’s positions at the Al-Sina’a (Industrial) and Al-‘Amal (Workers) Districts; however, they were unsuccessful in their infiltration attempt, as the SAA’s 137th Artillery Brigade of the 17th Reserve Division forestalled their advance before forcing them to withdrawal to the east.

Meanwhile, southeast of the Al-Sina’a District, the terrorist group carried out another assault on the Deir Ezzor Military Airport; but, unlike their other attacks, this attack did not last very long, as the soldiers entrenched at the eastern gates destroyed 3 of ISIS’ armored vehicles, while also killing 18 enemy combatants before the terrorist group withdrew from the base.

 

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Editor-in-Chief Specializing in Near Eastern Affairs and Economics.

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Lars Palapies
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Lars Palapies

Another day full of “great news” from fairytale land. I just wonder how all the loss of land formerly hold by the regime could slip through the cracks of such vigilant “journalists”. Probably it always occurs when they are busy focusing on conflicts between rebel factions