Following a week of inactivity, the Islamic State of Iraq and Al-Sham (ISIS) launched a large-scale assault on the National Defense Forces’ (NDF) frontline positions at Maskar Al-Hesan, Jubb Al-Jarrah and Al-Massa’oudiyeh in the northeastern countryside of the Homs Governorate,  attacking all three towns from their southeastern flanks before the terrorist group was devastated by a counter-assault from the Syrian Armed Forces on Wednesday morning.

The ISIS assault at Maskar Al-Hesan, Jubb Al-Jarrah and Al-Massa’oudiyeh began around 8:45 A.M. (Damascus Time) on Wednesday morning, when a large contingent from the terrorist group simultaneously stormed the aforementioned towns, as they endeavored to infiltrate past the National Defense Forces’ positions and enter this rugged area situated just south of the Al-Salamiyah District of the Hama Governorate.

Unfortunately for the militants from ISIS, they faced-off against a well-armed NDF unit that remained unmoved by the surprise assaults on Maskar Al-Hesan, Jubb Al-Jarrah and Al-Massa’oudiyeh.

As the battle between the NDF and ISIS waged-on, the latter terrorist group was unable to penetrate the Syrian Armed Forces’ defensive positions, resulting in heavy losses and a fractured frontline.

This battle finally reached its conclusion after NDF reinforcements poured-in from a nearby village to help drive back the ISIS combatants in the Jubb Al-Jarrah area – the battle lasted for almost seven hours before ISIS finally withdrew towards a nearby location in order to evade the constant aerial attacks by the Syrian Arab Air Force (SAAF).

According to a military source in Homs, the Syrian Armed Forces killed 34 militants from ISIS, including Jamal Bashir Al-‘Abdullah, Nour al-Deen Faysal Al-Moubussali, Qassem Mohammad Bustani, ‘Umar Yousif Dandashi, Talal Mohammad Khaldoun, Mohammad Ahmad Al-Mohammad, Mohammad Mustafa Al-Hayyani.

ALSO READ  Over 300 FSA fighters defect to jihadist HTS group in northern Latakia

The source further added that all three towns are under the full-control of the Syrian Armed Forces.

 

Advertisements
Share this article:
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Editor-in-Chief Specializing in Near Eastern Affairs and Economics.

Notice: All comments represent the view of the commenter and not necessarily the views of AMN.

All comments that are not spam or wholly inappropriate are approved, we do not sort out opinions or points of view that are different from ours.

This is a Civilized Place for Public Discussion

Please treat this discussion with the same respect you would a public park. We, too, are a shared community resource — a place to share skills, knowledge and interests through ongoing conversation.

These are not hard and fast rules, merely guidelines to aid the human judgment of our community and keep this a clean and well-lighted place for civilized public discourse.

Improve the Discussion

Help us make this a great place for discussion by always working to improve the discussion in some way, however small. If you are not sure your post adds to the conversation, think over what you want to say and try again later.

The topics discussed here matter to us, and we want you to act as if they matter to you, too. Be respectful of the topics and the people discussing them, even if you disagree with some of what is being said.

Be Agreeable, Even When You Disagree

You may wish to respond to something by disagreeing with it. That’s fine. But remember to criticize ideas, not people. Please avoid:

  • Name-calling
  • Ad hominem attacks
  • Responding to a post’s tone instead of its actual content
  • Knee-jerk contradiction

Instead, provide reasoned counter-arguments that improve the conversation.