A number of high-ranking international officials have lately been at the Iranian capital to hold talks with their Iranian counterparts; most prominently, Ahmet Davutoğlu, the Turkish Prime Minister.

During his visit, the Turkish Premier unexpectedly showed a dramatic change in his country’s radical, one-sided attitude toward the Syrian crisis, emphasizing the peaceful solution as the only loophole for the war-torn country.

Davutoğlu’s recent statements are seen by many experts as triggered by the enormous turnout of the recently-held Iranian elections.

The success and transparency of the Iranian electoral process have been admitted by friends and foes alike. In a press briefing held on February 26th, Mark C. Toner, spokesman of the White House, reluctantly admitted the large turnout.

Still, the elections have been sharply criticized by Saudi Arabia, Iran’s bitter ideological enemy is almost the only democracy-free country in the world

Committing to its historic role in sowing sectarian and denominational rifts, Saudi-run media outlets undermined the parliamentary elections, claiming that Sunni Iranians have entirely abstained from taking part in the nation-wide process.

The ungrounded Saudi allegation have been refuted by none other than the Sunni MPs, who unanimously slammed the oil-rich kingdom for attempting to destabilize the country’s national unity.

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ALSO READ  Pentagon raises total of US soldiers injured from Iran attack to 64

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The Death Sentence of a Businessman in #Iran: The beginning of Factional War? https://t.co/zZxbqoJ5W3