An Iranian official inspects the tail of a crashed passenger airplane in Tehran, Iran, 10 August 2014. At least 40 passengers on an Iranian passenger jet were reported killed after it crashed shortly after take-off near Tehran's airport, the Irna news agency reported, citing the Iran Red Crescent Society. The plane was departing Tehran's Mehrabad airport on its way to Tabas, in the country's east. EPA/ABEDIN TAHERKENAREH

An Iranian police airplane flying to the country’s southeast has crashed, killing all seven people aboard, including a top police officer, the country’s official news agency reported.

The propeller Turbo Commander airplane crashed late on Saturday in the mountains outside of the provincial capital of Zahedan and searchers later found the wreckage, IRNA reported. The agency said the flight carried four passengers and three crew members.

Among those killed was Gen Mahmoud Sadeqi, a senior police officer in charge of investigations, IRNA reported.

Iran’s semi-official Fars news agency says the plane took off from Tehran to head to southeastern Iran to investigate an incident involving an attack on police there, without elaborating.

Authorities offered no immediate explanation for the crash, though Iranian airlines, including those run by the state, are chronically strapped for cash, rely on aging planes and have a spotty maintenance record.

While some operate Boeing and Airbus models, spare parts for Western-made planes are often hard to come by largely because of sanctions aimed at Iran’s nuclear program. Some sanctions have eased in recent months, however, due to an interim nuclear deal with world powers.

Those difficulties have left Iranian airlines increasingly reliant on planes developed by the Soviet Union and its successor states, though parts for aging Soviet-era planes can also be tough to get. That’s caused the country to be hit by a series of deadly crashes.

In August, a commercially flown IrAn-140, a twin-engine turboprop plane built with Ukranian technology off an old Soviet-era design, crashed after takeoff from Tehran, killing 39 people.

ALSO READ  Iran to arm naval forces with long-range cruise missiles

The last major airliner crash in Iran happened in January 2011, when an Iran Air Boeing 727 broke to pieces on impact while trying an emergency landing in a snowstorm in northwestern Iran, killing at least 77 people.

In July 2009, a Russian-made jetliner crashed in northwest Iran shortly after taking off from the capital, killing all 168 on board. A Russian-made Ilyushin 76 carrying members of the Revolutionary Guard crashed in the mountains of southeastern Iran in February 2003, killing 302 people aboard.

Share this article:
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Notice: All comments represent the view of the commenter and not necessarily the views of AMN.

All comments that are not spam or wholly inappropriate are approved, we do not sort out opinions or points of view that are different from ours.

This is a Civilized Place for Public Discussion

Please treat this discussion with the same respect you would a public park. We, too, are a shared community resource — a place to share skills, knowledge and interests through ongoing conversation.

These are not hard and fast rules, merely guidelines to aid the human judgment of our community and keep this a clean and well-lighted place for civilized public discourse.

Improve the Discussion

Help us make this a great place for discussion by always working to improve the discussion in some way, however small. If you are not sure your post adds to the conversation, think over what you want to say and try again later.

The topics discussed here matter to us, and we want you to act as if they matter to you, too. Be respectful of the topics and the people discussing them, even if you disagree with some of what is being said.

Be Agreeable, Even When You Disagree

You may wish to respond to something by disagreeing with it. That’s fine. But remember to criticize ideas, not people. Please avoid:

  • Name-calling
  • Ad hominem attacks
  • Responding to a post’s tone instead of its actual content
  • Knee-jerk contradiction

Instead, provide reasoned counter-arguments that improve the conversation.

1 Comment
Most Voted
Newest Oldest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments