When the U.S. Army entered the Iraqi capital of Baghdad for the first time in 2003, Colonel Asi Naser Al-Obaidi – a graduate from the Iraqi Military Academy – was tasked to head the northern Baghdad republican guard forces in order to protect the most wanted man by the U.S. and their allies.

After being defeated by the U.S. military and their allies, some of the Iraqi Army’s commanders fled to the nearby countries of Syria, Yemen, Jordan and Egypt; meanwhile, others took refuge in tribal areas of rural Iraq, where they had been protected by tribal laws.

One of these men was known as the ”Colonel”, he was quickly approached to join the militants fighting the U.S. troops and the Iraqi government forces.

Following several failed attempts to seize the Colonel, he was finally captured by the U.S. forces in 2005 and held inside the infamous ”Camp Bucca”, where his military background and loyalties were seen as a golden recruitment opportunity for the Al-Qaeda commanders imprisoned inside the camp.

The Colonel was released from Camp Bucca in 2011, when the U.S finally withdrew their armed forces from Iraq.

Upon his release, he quickly contacted his old prison companions and joined a rapidly growing terrorist network known as the “Islamic State of Iraq” (later added the “Al-Sham” to become “ISIS”).

Immediately after joining the terrorist group, the Colonel attacked the same tribes that offered him refuge when he was fleeing the U.S. Armed Forces in 2003.

The Colonel would also attack nearby city councilmen who served within the ranks of the Iraqi police in the city of Haditha during the U.S. invasion.

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The Colonel found himself behind bars again in January 2012 after a successful Iraqi Army raid; however, this time, his stay did not last long as he was lucky enough to escape among the other dangerous terrorist suspects during the infamous ”Abu Ghraib” prison break of July 2012.

Having the previous military experience and local knowledge of the tribes, geography and prominent individuals in rural Iraq,  through the Colonel quickly rose through the ranks to become the chief of staff for ISIS and the head of Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi’s (ISIS’ self-proclaimed “Caliph”) private military council.

Following several unsuccessful attempts by ISIS to capture Haditha (Al-Anbar Governorate), the Colonel was tasked to infiltrate the city’s gates and lead an army of terrorists to inflict pain and suffering amongst the Colonel’s old friends and family.

The Colonel’s efforts were once against stopped short due to the magnificent resistance of the Al-Gghaifa Sunni tribal fighters – along side the Iraqi Army, aviation and the U.S. led coalition planes.

Unconfirmed reports coming out of Iraq have mentioned the possibility of his death during the attack, a death that would end a magnificent military carrier tainted by his decision to join a dark and a brutal force aimed to destroy his country.

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