BEIRUT, LEBANON (9:10 A.M.) – The Syrian military did not give Russia the advanced Israeli surface-to-air missile that landed inside Syria in July 2018, the Russian aviation publication Avia.Pro reported on Thursday.

Instead, the Russian publication claims that Damascus transferred the Israeli missile to Iran, who, in turn, plans to reverse engineer the projectile.

“As it turned out, the missile did not go to Moscow, but to Iran, which means serious problems for Israel against the backdrop of an escalation of the situation with the Islamic Republic,” Avia.Pro reported.

“In fact, the missile did not go to Russia at all, but to Iran. <…> On this day, the Iranian cargo Il-76 was at Damascus International Airport, and could very well have delivered the Israeli missile defense system to Iran to study its capabilities,” they said, citing a military expert.

“Russia’s interest in foreign military technology is quite obvious, but for Iran, this missile allows reveals features of the Israeli missile defense system. If Tehran really took possession of such a missile, then the reliability of Israeli air defense systems is in question, even if the missile defense has been seriously damaged,” they added.

The news about Syria first capturing this Israeli missile and transferring it to the Russian military was first reported by the Chinese news service Sina.

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Any reversed engineered or enhanced missile systems by the Iranians should be inscribed with the words, “To Israel with love”

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Avia.Pro is again full of shït : it took Iran about 35 years to make a replica of 70’s AIM-54 Phoenix and it was full of “classic” electronic parts with old school, but custom microships of this era. What makes a missile like the Stunner, which is the size of a 20km ranged Patriot PAC-3 but ranges 160km is the latest generation of micro-electronics and micro-mechanics (maybe should I say nano) which is only available to Israel since the Tel-Aviv area has became a Silicon-Valley v2.0. If Iran was able to replicate the latest generation of Intel CPUs, they’d flood… Read more »