The cost from damage to infrastructure and economic losses in Yemen’s civil war is more than $14 billion so far, according to a confidential report seen by Reuters that highlights the effort needed to rebuild the country, where more than half the population is suffering from malnutrition.

“The conflict has so far resulted in damage costs (still partial and incomplete) of almost $7 billion and economic losses (in nominal terms) of over $7.3 billion in relation to production and service delivery,” said the May 6 joint report by the World Bank, United Nations, Islamic Development Bank and European Union.

The 16-month civil war has killed more than 6,500 people, displaced more than 2.5 million and caused a humanitarian catastrophe in a country with a per capita gross domestic product the World Bank last estimated at only $1,097 in 2013.

The Preliminary Damage and Needs Assessment report is an internal working document that is not being publicly released.

“These preliminary findings are not only partial, but also evolving” because the conflict is ongoing, the report said.

A survey by Yemen’s education ministry cited by the report showed that of 1,671 schools in 20 governorates which suffered damage, 287 need major reconstruction, 544 were serving as shelters for internally displaced persons, and 33 were occupied by armed groups. Based on a sample of 143 schools, the estimated cost of the damage was $269 million.

Citing the Ministry of Public Health and Population, the report said 900 of 3,652 facilities providing vaccination services were not operating in early 2016, leaving 2.6 million children under 15 at risk of contracting measles.

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In Taiz, Yemen’s third-largest city, the public health system has nearly collapsed, with half the public hospitals damaged or inaccessible.

The report could assess residential damage only in the cities of Sanaa, Aden, Taiz and Zinjibar, and data collection was cut off in Oct. 2015 — only about seven months into the conflict. That data alone found an estimated $3.6 billion in damage.

Source: Reuters

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Farhat Kaboudi
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Farhat Kaboudi

Yemen was always one of the poorest countries in the world and Saudis never thought before to help them .

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Yeah, and their asses are getting pounded. Technology isn’t a sure way to win a war.

Daeshbags Sux
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Daeshbags Sux

Especially when, to not end arrested by Sharia court and then beheaded for apostasy, you have to re-program the GPS to comply with the fact that the Earth is flat…

Rudy Verbuyst
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Rudy Verbuyst

NOT REALY A CIVIL WAR? BETTER WOULD BE TO CALL IT AN INVASION !