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The Houthi forces launched a Burkan H-2 ballistic missile towards the Saudi capital, today, targeting an airport in Riyadh.

The missile has allegedly reached its target. Saudi Arabian officials have yet to comment on the information.

The alleged attack comes just 10 days after the Saudi military intercepted a Houthi missile fired from Yemen, targeting civilian areas of the southwestern Saudi province of Najran on January 20.

The Houthis have repeatedly targeted areas in Saudi Arabia with missiles, with the Riyadh airport being targeted on November 4, 2017, prompting the Arab coalition to impose a temporary blockade on Yemeni ports.

The situation in Yemen has further escalated last November, when former allied Houthis and units loyal to former Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh started clashing, which resulted in the death of Saleh on December 4. The clashes were explained by the Saleh’s readiness to start talks with the Saudi-led coalition.

The military conflict dates back to 2015, when the fight between the government of President Abd Rabbuh Mansur Hadi and the Houthi rebels, backed by Saleh army units, broke out. The Saudi-led coalition of mostly Persian Gulf Arab countries has interfered in the conflict since March 2015 upon Hadi’s request, carrying out airstrikes against the Houthis.

Source: Sputnik, Saba

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Daeshbags Sux
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Daeshbags Sux

They should consider to fill the warheads with anti-bunker/runway submunitions.
Durandal bomb principle : many anti-concrete rockets are delivered, a parachute stabilise ’em vetically, the rocket engine is then fired, then these pierce through runway (or hardened shelters) concrete and only explode once under the concrete. This makes many more damages to an airport than surface blasts. Mixing wit white-phosphorus submunitions can be interesting too as if you can ignite kerosene, you may do even more damages…

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The Houthis have repeatedly targeted areas in Saudi Arabia with missiles, with the Riyadh airport being targeted on November 4, 2017, prompting the Arab coalition to impose a temporary blockade on Yemeni ports.

TwisterMr
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Saleh wasnted to establish talks with the coalition. The situation in Yemen has further escalated last November, when former allied Houthis and units loyal to former Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh started clashing, which resulted in the death of Saleh on December 4.