BEIRUT, LEBANON (11:30 P.M.) – A member of the Defense, Security and Anti-Corruption Committee of the Azerbaijani Parliament, Nizami Safarov, commented on the statements of Syrian President Bashar Al-Assad regarding the transfer of militants from Syria to Karabakh.

Safarov told Russia’s Sputnik Agency: “The statements of President Bashar al-Assad do not cause any feelings other than regret and condemnation.”

“We must bear in mind that the offensive countermeasures of the Azerbaijani side fall within the strict framework of international law, which is the right to self-defense, which is affirmed by Article 51 of the Charter of the United Nations and is implemented in strict compliance with the rules of international humanitarian law, which are based on Geneva conventions of August 12, 1949,” he said.

Safarov pointed out that ” Azerbaijan has an army with the most advanced and equipped weapons in the region, capable of carrying out all the tasks assigned to it.”

“The allegations of using any groups of terrorist fighters seem simply ridiculous,” he said.

He stressed that, “Azerbaijan, as a state party to the set of legal treaties to combat terrorism, fully shares the position of the United Nations expressed in Security Council resolutions 2178 (2014) and 2396 (2017), according to which terrorism in all its forms and manifestations is considered one of the most serious threats to peace and security.”

Safarov pointed out that “his country acceded on December 4, 1997 to the International Convention against the Recruitment, Use, Financing and Training of Mercenaries, adopted on December 4, 1984, and it introduced a rule on criminal responsibility for such crimes in national legislation.”

ALSO READ  Karabakh Republic calls on Armenia, Iran, Russia to establish joint counter-terrorism center

The Syrian President, Bashar Al-Assad told Sputnik in a separate interview this week that Turkey was the main initiator of a new round of conflict in Karabakh.

He also indicated that Ankara supports terrorists in Syria and Libya, and uses them in Nagorno Karabakh.

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